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Unsurprisingly, when you’re THINKING about words that end in ING, your mind will naturally gravitate toward verbs. In the present progressive tense, also called the present continuous tense, you add ING to the end to indicate an action is ONGOING. Joe is RUNNING for office and Jane is RALLYING supporters. But, there’s more to ING verbs than present progressive verbs. Read more about words that end in ING.

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More About Words That End in ING

As explained above, a verb ending in ING is called a present progressive or present continuous verb. It’s an action that is CONTINUING to take place. You can also talk about these sorts of verbs ending in ING in the past or future too. Jerry was DRIVING to work when Elaine called him. Chandler will be MOVING to Yemen next week.

It depends on how you choose to use these ING words, because the verbs can function as nouns. Gerunds are words that end in ING that function as a subject or object of a sentence. Tim enjoys GARDENING on the weekend. The teacher praised Sally’s WRITING for its clarity. Abigail’s favorite hobby is KNITTING. These gerunds are all words that end with ING. 

And then you’ve got other ING words like FLING, BLING, and WING too! They’re neither verbs nor gerunds. They just happen to be words that end in ING! Not sure where to go next with this DIZZYING array of options? Perhaps check out words with Q not followed by U. They’re a rare breed in English, but they’re also more numerous than you might suspect.

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